I Remember Tampa: Thanks for Listening, Thanks For Sharing

970 WFLA AM Tampa Bay 5/23/13 Reblog

I’d like to thank 970 WFLA’s AM Tampa Bay and their crew, Jack Harris, Tedd Webb, and Corey Dylan for reblogging I Remember Tampa yesterday. It was in May of last year that I originally posted the video on YouTube. In early June, it started skyrocketing in views after Jack mentioned it on his morning show and posted it on his blog. Since that time, it has been seen over 24,000 times, and that number has been steadily climbing every month. I’d also like to thank Dan Perez for posting it and identifying the sources of all the pictures on his wonderful Tampapix website, which is celebrating its 10 year anniversary this month. And, of course, I’d like to thank The Tampa Natives Show and its hosts, Mario Núñez, Sally Núñez, and Steve Cannella for inspiring the song through their efforts in preserving Tampa’s rich history, and for believing in my work enough to embrace I Remember Tampa as the show’s theme song. Last but not least, I’d like to thank all the fans and followers of these programs and sites for taking the time to view, comment on, and share the video. I know all this activity stems from our mutual love for this city. Something tells me that this video has only scratched the surface of potential views, and that as long as it remains archived throughout the web, future generations will gravitate towards it and keep coming back when they want to reminisce about the experiences here in Tampa.

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1963: JFK Visits Tampa

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Tony Zappone was a very young photagrapher when he got the opportunity of a lifetime. Days before John F. Kennedy was assasinated, he visited Tampa, FL, and Mr. Zappone was there to capture some timeless images of one of the most beloved presidents in U.S. history. The following paragraph’s are Big 13.com’s account of this special moment in time:

“The day was sunny, mild and clear…somewhere in the mid-70’s.  It was perfect Florida weather and excellent for taking pictures.  If it was slightly cool in the shade, the adrenalin of JFK’s visit warmed the onlooker’s body to a comfortable temperature. Despite the lack of any serious humidity, Kennedy, apparently a quick change artist, switched his suit three times during his five-hour visit.  An aide carried extra clothes in a bag that remained undetected by the press and spectators.  He made the changes of clothes in the helicopter on the way to Al Lopez Field, after his appearance at the International Inn and in an anteroom behind the speaker’s platform at Ft. Homer Hesterly Armory.

Air Force One, the official plane of the chief executive, set down precisely on schedule at 11:24 that morning. Members of the local press were taken by bus to the tarmac and assumed their positions atop a flatbed truck loaned for the day by the Florida Steel Corporation.  Things were fine until the national press corps stormed out of Air Force One to join us on the truck and more or less took over.  I learned the game really fast and edged them off to the side like I owned the place.

Less than a minute later the man I had wanted to see in person for so long walked out the tail exit and down the stairs.  Kennedy looked exactly as I had seen him many times on TV, in films, in magazines and in the newspaper.  The leader of the free world was just as “bigger than life” in person as I had imagined him to be.  He carried a hat in his right hand and hardly let go of it the entire trip.  JFK was in Tampa without his admired first lady Jacqueline, who stayed in Washington to care for other business.”

View this moment in Tampa’s rich history, alongside many other memorable images. Visit Tampapix today, and watch the I Remember Tampa video, as you click through the countless links that lead to the sources of each picture in the video.  And don’t forget to visit the Tampa Natives Show website, too, where there are archived episodes specifically dealing with WTVT Channel 13, Tony Zappone, and various other topics dedicated to remembering Tampa’s colorful past.